Group of Women Complete Full Talmud (3-Minute Inspirational Video)

Group of Women Complete Full Talmud (3-Minute Inspirational Video)

90,000 men gathered last week to celebrate the Siyum Hashas in New Jersey, after 7.5 years of learning the entire Babylonian Talmud page by page. And in Jerusalem, a small group of women gathered to celebrate their own completion of the Talmud. I especially loved to see all the JewishMOMs and grandmothers in the final shot of the video. Mazal tov! What an inspiration for all of us, no matter how busy we are, to keep on learning even a little bit of Torah every single day. Even 5 minutes…to stay inspired and connected to Hashem’s holy Torah.

 
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11 comments

  1. I am so inspired. Thank you! Anyone want to join me starting the daf yomi in Melbourne?

  2. Rachelle

    Kol hakavod to a group of women in Alon Shvut who also completed Daf Yomi (as I understand, many went to the siyum at Matan too).
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkOUR2fMLPI

  3. So inspiring! Something to look forward to in my next life phase.

  4. Hadassah Aber

    Truly inspiring and revolutionary. Much rather see this than weight lifting or olympic performances! even though this is very yotzei min hakelal it is a major accomplishment to feel connected to Hashem, the Torah and am Yisroel. We can each start with something – the weekly parsha day by day, the sefer Tehillim monthly, the sefer mitzvohs of the Rambam but it is within our reach if we stretch for it.

  5. Hadassah, I agree. I am in awe of these women.

    Chana Jenny, I meant to tell you – this past Shabbos, I was at a Shabbos afternoon study group and this woman comes over to me and says, “I read your comments on jewishmom.com.” So I say, “Who are you?” and she says, “My name is Hadassah Aber.” I right away recognized her name from this website, and we embraced like old friends! we have been reading each other’s comments right here for a long time now

    so much fun
    thank you, Chana Jenny
    thank you, Hadassah
    it was great to meet you in person

  6. Chana Y.

    B”H

    After reading this post I just felt like I need to join this women, but I don’t have time for it. Then I found the website sinai.org.il, the daf hayomi in 10 minutes (for busy people like us mommies!). Is not ideal but it is an alternative for now.
    Thank you Chana Jenny!

    • thank you for the tip!! actually i gave it to my husband who just started the daf hayomi and he says its great to prepare for the shiour or also to listen to it when he has no time!! thank you very much!!

  7. Wow what an inspiration !
    I wish I could complete the Talmud in 2020 with the current cycle but sadly I’m still not that far in my studies… 🙂

  8. in my community it is unthinkable that a women learns gemara (not to mention that we are of course also not learning mishna).
    it is a big no-no and women who would muse about it aloud would have not good reputation for the future.

  9. I’m just seeking to understand and not to offend anyone with the following question, G-d forbid.

    I come from a community where most women are not encouraged to learn gemara, and especially not in the same manner as men. However, I am aware that there are different opinions on the matter, and the women in the video who completed the daf yomi are relying on one of these halachic opinions. I sincerely admire their dedication and obvious love for learning.

    My question is: why are some of the women not following the basic laws of tsniut (modesty), i.e. covering their arms until a tefach (handsbreadth) above the elbow, or married women covering their hair with up to, but not more than, a tefach showing?

    From what I was taught, and also from my own research, these are minimum requirements. Of course, I am willing to hear if anyone learned something different, and if so, can give sources.

    If these women are so committed to learning Torah, then I have no doubt they are just as committed to living it. In an effort to respect and appreciate Torah Jews from a different community than mine, I would like to understand their explanation for the way they dress.

    Once again, I hope I did not insult anyone with this question.

    Esther G

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